Research: Professional football youth trainer remuneration

Publication by Nick Veenbrink

How much does a youth trainer employed by a professional football club earn? Is it possible for a youth trainer to work fulltime and what is the added value of a related diploma/license? Intrigued by these questions, and a previously conducted research project into the remuneration for amateur youth trainers, NMC Bright decided to present this benchmark report that looks into youth trainer remuneration at professional football clubs. This report provides the reader with a better insight into the work field of youth trainers employed by professional football clubs. The results point out that only 29% of the youth trainers included in this research have a fulltime position and that 57% of the youth trainers included in this report have a contract for 20 hours per week or less. These and other results can be found in the professional football youth trainer remuneration benchmark report.

Targetgroup: Eredivisie and Keuken Kampioen Divisie
The research was conducted under all 29 paid professional football clubs with a youth academy in the 2017/’18 season. A total of 21 clubs have participated in, and made contributions to, the results of this report. Out of these 21 clubs, 11 are active in the Dutch Eredivisie (the highest division in the Netherlands). The remaining 10 clubs play their matches in the Dutch Keuken Kampioen Divisie (the second highest division in the Netherlands). For the purpose of this research, data about remuneration, amount of FTE’s (full time employees) and level of education among staff members has been gathered. In the processing of the results, the framework of the Quality & Performance Program has been used.

How much does a youth trainer employed by a professional football club earn?
By looking at the national average income of € 2.855 per month, as established by the Dutch government (CPB, 2018), our research shows that 21% of youth trainers employed by professional football clubs earn an average or above average wage. The remaining 79% of youth trainers earn less than average and are on part-time contracts with relatively low remunerations. The height of the remuneration is mostly influenced by the age category of the team that is coached, as well as which status the youth academy has been awarded. For example, a trainer who coaches an U19 team at a youth academy that has been awarded the ‘international’ status earns more than a trainer who coaches an U11 team that has been awarded the ‘regional’ status.

Is it possible for a youth trainer employed by a professional football club to work fulltime?
Only 29% of youth trainers in professional football are on a fulltime contract. These types of contracts are mostly available at clubs with youth academies that have been awarded the ‘international’ status. This means that the majority of youth trainers are on a part-time contract with a relatively low remuneration. This leads to the fact that for most youth trainers it is a necessity to work multiple jobs at once.

What is the value of a diploma/license?
A higher football technical diploma/license leads to a higher remuneration. To clarify, a youth trainer with the UEFA A license earns an average of € 2.112 per month, whereas a youth trainer with the UEFA C license earns an average of only € 1.049 per month.

What does this mean?
Wouter Kuperus, director NMC Bright: “The report shows that a fulltime contract with an (above) average income is not common among youth trainers at professional football clubs. For the majority of this group, coaching a youth team is a part-time job. Oftentimes the remuneration is not high enough to maintain a living, which means the youth trainer has to work multiple jobs at once. If we, in the Netherlands, would be able to create an environment in which more youth trainers have the opportunity to work fulltime and earn an (above) average income, the professional perspective of youth trainers could be greatly improved”.

You can download the full benchmark report professional football youth trainer remuneration here. Note: it’s in Dutch…